BME/BKN 504: Course information


Topics: At the end of the semester, students should be able to define and explain Neuromechanics as the evolutionary co-adaptation of the nervous system and the body in the context of mechanical function by:

 

BMEBKN_504_flyer
BME 504 Flyer


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Target Audience: Graduate students in good standing in the areas of Engineering, Neuroscience, and Biokinesiology. Also open to advanced senior students in Engineering or graduate students from other fields with permission of the instructor.



Syllabus: Download syllabus here

Grading:
Homework 15% (~bi-weekly)
Reading quizzes & seminars 15% (~weekly)
Midterm exam I 20% (in-class, closed notes)
Midterm exam II 20% (in-class, closed notes)
Project 30% (semester-long, by groups assigned by Prof.)

The project will be a computational exploration of a musculoskeletal system and will be assigned by week 5. Final project in lieu of final exam.

 

Textbook:

Homework : To be handed in and graded individually, although I encourage and expect you to work in groups. Homework sets are due at the beginning of class on the date listed in the syllabus. Homework will be accepted late with a 10% penalty per day after the due date and before solutions are posted, and 50% penalty thereafter. I strongly encourage you to do, and hand in, all homework even if with a penalty for delay. Some exam questions will be directly related to homework assignments, and the homework is designed to teach you the tools needed for the individual projects.


Reading quizzes & seminars:

Special Needs : Any student requesting academic adjustments or accommodations based on a disability is required to register with Disability Services and Programs (DSP) each semester. A letter of verification for approved accommodations can be obtained from DSP. Please be sure the letter is delivered to me no later than 2 weeks after the first class. DSP is located in the Center for Academic Support, STU 301, open 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, (213) 740-0776.


Academic Integrity : General principles of academic integrity include and incorporate the concept of respect for the intellectual property of others, the expectation that individual work will be submitted unless otherwise allowed by an instructor, and the obligations both to protect one’s own academic work from misuse by others as well as to avoid using another’s work as one’s own. All students are expected to understand and abide by these principles.


Web Page : BMEBKN504


Statement on Academic Integrity

USC seeks to maintain an optimal learning environment. General principles of academic honesty include the concept of respect for the intellectual property of others, the expectation that individual work will be submitted unless otherwise allowed by an instructor, and the obligations both to protect one's own academic work from misuse by others as well as to avoid using another's work as one's own.

All students are expected to understand and abide by these principles. SCampus, the Student Guidebook, contains the Student Conduct Code in Section 11.00, while the recommended sanctions are located in Appendix A:http://www.usc.edu/dept/publications/SCAMPUS/gov/. Students will be referred to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs and Community Standards for further review, should there be any suspicion of academic dishonesty. The Review process can be found at: http://www.usc.edu/student-affairs/SJACS/.

 

page last modified on November 20, 2015.
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